Creating Kammervolk: Mark Romei

Creating Kammervolk: Mark Romei

How do you build a show? We asked three key players from Kammervolk Collective to walk us through it. 


     
Kammervolk
Melbourne, Australia

Creating Kammervolk: Mark Romei

How do you build a show? We asked three key players from Kammervolk Collective to walk us through it. 


     

Mark Romei created the art for Kammervolk: Immersion. 

How different was your creative process in for immersion from your regular practice? Did the inclusion of sound/audio components influence your output in any way? 

I like to keep my creative process as exploratory and experimental as possible, while also limiting myself to using a minimal amount of elements each time. Current works in my regular art practice involve using laser cut patterns derived from hand-drawn shapes to create different paintings, experimenting with the possibilities and complexities created by this merging of artistic expression and technological fabrication. 

I view the works created for Kammervolk as an extension of this practice, with one piece demonstrating part of my painting practice live for camera, and the other using refractions and intensities of light instead of paint, but still essentially using the same motion in producing the art. In both works, there is an emphasis on movement and gesture, contrasted to the sharpness of the combination of digital methodology. This kind of quick gestural expression, which when created through a process of technological addition results in a rhythmic and harmonious artwork which is a repeated notion throughout my work.

Aside from your artistic practice, you're also currently studying architecture! Does your understanding of physical space influence your art in any way, and did this affect your work for immersion? 

There are many ways in which my art practice and architectural work influence one another. The dialogue between low and high tech is something both practices explore: examining and experimenting with the new methods of production with an aim for simplicity and reverence for traditional practices. For Immersion, both works are a dialogue between the physical and the digital, each containing numerous layers of each in their production. 

Their richness lies in these layers. For example, the light piece is the layering of a hand-drawn form which is digitally manipulated, laser cut out, used in a physical manner to cast shadows and refractions with lights, recorded and then digitally manipulated once more, creating a complex relationship between the digital and the physical, where they are constantly in dialogue with one another, mirroring our own lives in many ways. 

Catch Mark's work in Kammervolk: Immersion on the 24th and 25th May at Neon Parlour in Thornbury at 8pm. Tickets are available here